December 7, 2019

About Joe Miller

Joe Miller is a Staff Writer for District Sports Page covering the Redskins. Joe is a southern Maryland native and an alumnus of the University of Maryland with a degree in communication. He’s been a passionate follower of D.C. sports, especially the Redskins, his entire life. Joe works for the Bowie Baysox and contributes content for Son of Washington. You can follow Joe on Twitter @JoeCoolMiller.

OPINION: The Washington Redskins should let Robert Griffin III play

Let me preface this by saying that I would never propose that anyone play injured. If Robert Griffin III is truly unable to play physically, he obviously should be shelved and allowed more time to heal. But if team doctors clear him and deem that physically he’s capable of playing in an NFL football game and everything that entails, the Washington Redskins absolutely should start Griffin against Dallas Monday night.

The reasons why many believe the third-year quarterback, once touted as the savior of this long downtrodden franchise, shouldn’t play Monday night are many. But each is more farfetched than the last, the hysterical ramblings of a fanbase too traumatized to think clearly. A fanbase so accustomed to heartbreak and disappointment when it comes to their favorite football franchise, that Murphy’s Law might as well be Newton’s Law. Absolute. Certain.

Ultimately it’s out of fear that fans suggest he shouldn’t play. Fear of another injury. Fear of more losing. Fear of starting over. And fear has a way of making people irrational. The three most common and erroneous of the objections to RG3 playing are as follows: [Read more…]

OPINION: For Washington Redskins, time to say ‘hello’ to Helu

With the 1-5 Washington Redskins off to a poor start (yet again), it’s not too early to start considering changing things up. Jay Gruden indicated as much in his press conference Monday, saying that the coaching staff would look into doing just that. When later asked if that meant potential personnel changes or certain players getting more playing time, he responded, “Yeah, that’s something to take into account. We have to look at that. We have to look at the guys that aren’t playing. There’s a reason why we have the guys in front of them, but we’ll see if there’s a way we can upgrade our roster.”

He went on to say that the primary changes to which he was referring involved meetings and practice routines, but nonetheless, with a team playing as poorly as the Redskins are, the door should be open to less prominent players getting more playing time. One such player is running back Roy Helu. [Read more…]

Washington Redskins Week 5 Analysis: Defensive Notes

The Washington Redskins defense had an up-and-down night against the defending Super Bowl Champion Seattle Seahawks Monday Night in the Redskins’ 27-17 loss at home. At times, they looked absolutely porous, allowing the Seahawks offense to move the ball at will, while at other times showing flashes of dominance.

The Redskins were certainly aided by a total of 13 penalties for 90 yards against the Seahawks (the majority of which on the offense), but I don’t quite buy into the notion that this is what kept the Redskins in the game.

More than likely, you’ve heard by now that the Seahawks were ‘robbed of three touchdowns’ negated by penalties. But if you actually examine each instance, you’ll see that two of those cancelled touchdowns occurred on the same drive which ultimately resulted in a successful field goal. The third occurred on a drive where they went on to score a touchdown anyways. So in essence, all in all, instead of scoring a possible 14 points on those two drives, they ended up scoring 10 points. A four-point difference is a lot different than ‘three touchdowns’.

Additionally, penalties are always an issue for the Seahawks. In their Super Bowl winning season last year, they had the most penalties in football.  To imply that if Seattle limited its penalties, Washington would’ve been blown out is an exercise in futility because it ignores reality. It’s part of who they are.

Sorry, rant over. Let’s get to the notes:

[Read more…]

Washington Redskins Week 2 Analysis: Offensive Notes

The Washington Redskins offense thoroughly dominated the Jacksonville Jaguars Sunday en route to the team’s first victory since Nov. 3 of last year. The 41 points scored by the offense was their highest output since their 45-point showing against the Bears in late October last season.

However, in spite of their success, the story of this game will be the ankle injury quarterback Robert Griffin III suffered while making a throw on the run early in the first quarter. Griffin said Monday that the MRI showed no ankle fracture but the timetable for his return is still inconclusive, and he very well could miss a significant amount of time if not the rest of the season.

The injury could not only have a huge impact on the Redskins this season but may even alter the entire future of the franchise for years to come. The biggest question for this season now becomes how well can backup and fellow 2012 draft pick, Kirk Cousins, play as the starter in Griffin’s absence.

If RG3 doesn’t return this year, and Cousins is able to lead the team to a successful winning season, there’ll be a lot of tough questions for the front office in the offseason. The offense under Cousins got off to a good start Sunday. [Read more…]

Washington Redskins 2014 Season Preview Part VII: Inside Linebackers

All this week leading up to the Washington Redskins 2014 season opener against the Houston Texans on Sept. 7, District Sports Page is taking an in-depth look at the players that will make up the 53-man roster to start the season in a position-by-position breakdown.

In Part I, Neal Dalal took a look at the Quarterback position.
In Part II, Eric Hobeck examined the situation at running back.
In Part III, Joe Mercer previewed the wide receiver corps.
In Part IV, Joe Ziegengeist evaluated the offensive line.
In Part V, Joe Mercer reviewed Jordan Reed and the tight ends.
In Part VI, Neil previewed the defensive line.

Here is our preview of the inside linebackers.


Perry Riley comes up with the ball in 2011. (photo by Brian Murphy)

Perry Riley comes up with the ball in 2011. (photo by Brian Murphy)

Washington Redskins Inside Linebackers

SUBTRACTIONS: London Fletcher (retired), Nick Barnett (free agency), Bryan Kehl (free agency), Josh Hull (released)

ADDITIONS: Adam Hayward (free agency), Akeem Jordan (free agency), Darryl Sharpton** (free agency, placed on IR)

STARTERS: Perry Riley (“Jack” Linebacker), Keenan Robinson (“Mike” Linebacker)

BACKUPS: Will Compton, Adam Hayward, Akeem Jordan

Replacing London Fletcher is the biggest storyline for the inside linebackers in 2014 (Photo by Brian Murphy)

Replacing London Fletcher is the biggest storyline for the inside linebackers in 2014 (Photo by Brian Murphy)

Perry Riley: The team’s “jack” linebacker returns after signing a three-year/$13 million contract in the offseason. Riley had an up-and-down year in the final season of his rookie contract in 2013, leading to debate as to whether or not the team would even bring back the 2010 fourth-rounder.

But with many holes, including inside linebacker due to Fletcher’s retirement, the team decided to re-sign Riley just before the start of free agency. He had a strong year in 2012 and looked to be on the rise. But although he led the team in tackles for the first time in his career last season, he seemed to regress a bit as he often struggled in coverage and, like many others, had too many missed tackles.

Riley is still young, only 26, so there’s certainly still time for him to improve and he’ll look to rebound in 2014 with improved tackling and coverage.

Keenan Robinson: When Fletcher announced his plans to retire towards the end of last season, it was immediately clear the Redskins would have a huge hole to fill in the offseason. While the 16-year veteran struggled last year, he was still the heart and soul of the defense and was truly a coach on the field with his knowledge and leadership. With the offseason acquisitions of Hayward, Jordan, and Sharpton, it was not clear initially who would fill the void on the starting defense.

As it turned out, the team decided to go with an in-house option, giving Robinson the first team reps in OTA’s and mini-camp. The third-year player has minimal experience, missing significant time due to pectoral injuries in each of his first two seasons, but when Washington drafted him in the fourth round of the 2012 draft, it appeared the team had a long, athletic linebacker that could perhaps take Fletcher’s place eventually.

While injuries may have stunted his development, it appears Robinson is up for the task in year three as he’s looked very good in training camp and preseason with the first-team defense. He will take over Fletcher’s “mike” role and will be responsible for making the calls in the defensive huddle. If he can stay healthy, he could be in line for a major breakout year.

Adam Hayward: After their extremely poor performance last season, improving the special teams units was a huge priority for Bruce Allen and Jay Gruden this offseason. The team went about this by bringing in hard-nosed players who have excelled on special teams in the past.

Enter Hayward who was drafted in the sixth round of the 2007 draft by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and served as the special teams captain for them each of the past three seasons. The Redskins announced the signing of the eight-year veteran to a three-year deal on only the second day of free agency, indicating bringing him in to improve the special teams was a top priority. While he can fill in at inside linebacker, and has done so in the past with the Bucs, his primary duty will be to lead the revamped special teams unit.

Will Compton:  An undrafted rookie last season, Compton spent the majority of the year on the practice squad until getting promoted to the active roster in late December after Barnett was placed on IR. The Redskins did well to develop him and it appears he’s ready to contribute in his second season. Throughout training camp and the preseason, Compton consistently got reps with the second-team defense and can play either linebacker spot.

While he’s not a tremendous athlete, the 25-year-old linebacker appears to make sound tackles and knows the defense. Barring injury to one of the starters, he figures to primarily contribute on special teams in 2014.

Akeem Jordan: A free agent who played for the Kansas City Chiefs last year, Washington brought in Jordan on a one-year deal to provide depth at inside linebacker and further bolster the revamped special teams.

The 28-year-old had spent the first six seasons of his career under Andy Reid (first with the Philadelphia Eagles then Chiefs) before signing with Washington. Jordan is more of just a two-down linebacker because of deficiencies in coverage but he still figures to be a contributor on special teams.

Darryl Sharpton: A 26-year-old free agent coming from the Houston Texans, Sharpton was another one-year signing to provide depth and help on special teams. Unfortunately, the hard-hitting linebacker suffered a serious high-ankle sprain in the preseason and was placed on IR.


Joe Miller is Staff Writer for District Sports Page covering the Redskins. A southern Maryland native, Joe is an alumnus of the University of Maryland with a degree in communication. He’s been a passionate follower of D.C. sports and especially the Redskins his entire life, even watching a Redskins’ Super Bowl victory from his dad’s arms as a baby in 1992. When not watching sports, Joe works at the Bowie Baysox, a minor league baseball team in Prince George’s County, MD and also contributes content for Son of Washington. You can follow Joe on Twitter @JoeCoolMiller.

Washington Redskins Preseason Game 2 Analysis: Takeaways for the Defense

The Washington Redskins were able to defeat the Cleveland Browns Monday night in a sloppy game that ultimately resulted in a 24-23 victory for Washington. Here are some key takeaways for the Redskins defense:

AREAS OF CONCERN

Penalties: The yellow flags were a problem for the team all night as they accrued 11 penalties for 100 yards as a whole. The defense was responsible for five of them. The worst of which occurred in the second quarter with the Browns facing 3rd-and-18. Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel could not complete a short pass (which was highly unlikely to get a first down even if completed) but Redskins cornerback E.J. Biggers was flagged on the play for defensive holding. Only a five-yard infraction, but one that also results in an automatic first down.

As the official announced the call, the Redskins sideline voiced their frustration. There’s no telling what was said but the uproar produced another flag, unsportsmanlike conduct charged to the Redskins bench, immediately following the initial announcement.

While the second penalty can’t be blamed on the defense, the first one absolutely cannot happen especially in a third-and-long situation. Granted, calls like this one have been in vogue this preseason and it’s possible they’ll tone down the frequency of such calls once the regular season arrives, but it prolonged a drive that should’ve been over and in the regular season, the team can’t afford to give opposing teams those kinds of extra opportunities.

[Read more…]

Washington Redskins Preseason Game 2 Analysis: Takeaways for the Offense

The Washington Redskins were able to defeat the Cleveland Browns last night in a sloppy game that ultimately resulted in a 24-23 victory for Washington. Here are some key takeaways for the Redskins offense:

AREAS OF CONCERN

Turnovers: The Redskins first team offense Monday Night much resembled the team last year that turned the ball over 33 times (good for 30th worst in the league). On the team’s opening drive, Alfred Morris was not able to catch a pitch to the left from Robert Griffin III resulting in a lost fumble which set the opposition up with great field position.

On the offense’s next possession, on third and long from Cleveland’s 27-yard line, Griffin made a terrible decision under duress, floating the ball towards a very well covered DeSean Jackson along the right sideline. It was easy pickings for Browns cornerback Joe Haden who returned it 37 yards. It was a throw Griffin just can’t make, especially in scoring position.

The team’s backup quarterbacks didn’t fare much better, as Kirk Cousins and Colt McCoy both threw interceptions later on. Turnovers were a major reason why the team struggled last year, often putting the defense in bad situations. This area must improve for the Redskins to be successful in the regular season.

RGIII scrambles: After an offseason where there was much talk of Griffin needing to develop as a traditional “pocket passer” to avoid taking so many hits, the quarterback took his fair share of punishment Monday night. On his first scramble, Griffin struggled to slide after bouncing out wide to the right. He came into contact with Browns linebacker Karlos Dansby four yards downfield, and it resulted in an ugly tangling of his legs as he went down awkwardly.

Later on the same drive, Griffin scrambled again, this time to his left. Instead of ducking out of bounds unharmed after a modest eight-to-ten yard gain, he cut upfield eventually colliding with three successive Browns defenders as he got knocked out of bounds. Not exactly what you want to see in a preseason game that means nothing.

If Griffin wants to stay healthy, he’ll need to better avoid contact going forward. For the record, he vowed to the fans after the game that he’d work on his sliding. We’ll see.

Poor run game: The Redskins first team unit wasn’t very good on the ground, with Morris running the ball 11 times for only 29 yards (a 2.6 average yards per carry). The struggles were epitomized early in the second quarter when the team ran the ball four straight times on the goal line and could not score, resulting in a turnover on downs.

The stretch-zone running game will need to be the backbone of this offense as the Redskins install a new passing scheme under first year head coach Jay Gruden, so they can ill-afford nights like tonight on the ground once the regular season hits.

BRIGHT SPOTS

DeSean Jackson: The team’s prized free agent acquisition had a strong showing in his Redskins debut with two catches for 34 yards. On both receptions, Jackson was able to get yards after the catch using every bit of the quickness and elusiveness we’ve seen throughout his career.

In addition, on the Haden interception, Jackson was ultimately the one to run him down from behind to make the tackle. Great hustle and effort, especially in a meaningless preseason game with nothing to prove. Expect him to be a big part of the offense this season, and not just on deep routes.

Moving the ball: Despite the offense’s turnover struggles, the team was actually able to move the ball pretty well through the air, as Griffin went 6-for-8 for 112 yards. A big highlight was a long 49-yard pass from Griffin to receiver Andre Roberts. On this play, Griffin initially looked right and pump faked before bombing the ball down the field left to Roberts who had the Browns’ Haden beat by a step.

The initial pump from Griffin gave him enough time to squeeze the pass into Roberts before the safety could get back over top to make a play on the ball. A beautiful throw and catch. Jackson clearly isn’t the only one who can beat defenders deep. Expect to see Griffin take some shots down the field to Roberts this year as well.

Kicking: After an opening game in which the rookie Zach Hocker appeared to best incumbent Kai Forbath, neither could distance himself Monday Night. Hocker was a perfect 2-for-2 on both his elongated extra point attempts, while Forbath hit the only Redskins field goal attempt of the game, a 26-yarder, as well as an extra point himself.

Both performed pretty well on kickoffs, although Hocker outdrove Forbath on average and even had a touchback on the game’s opening kickoff. Solid nights for both. The decision on who wins the starting job didn’t get any easier.

Other notables: Rookie receiver Ryan Grant had another strong showing catching four passes for 44 yards and a touchdown. It appears he’s a lock to make the team at this point.

Fellow receiver Rashad Ross had another strong night, showing off that same speed he showed in the preseason opener. He again had a long kick return, this time for 42 yards, and again had a long catch on a go route down the sideline, hauling in a 43-yard pass from Colt McCoy. He’s still got to be considered a long shot but his showing so far certainly has helped.

Washington Redskins Preseason Game 2 Preview: Cleveland Browns

by Joe Miller, Staff Writer

Robert Griffin III will play up to a quarter in the Washington Redskins second preseason game Monday night against the Browns (photo by Brian Murphy)

Here’s what to look for in the Monday night showdown between Washington and Cleveland:

Normally, Johnny Manziel coming to town for his second ever NFL game would be excitement enough, especially for a preseason game. But Kyle Shanahan will also make his first trip back to FedEx field since he and his father were shown the door following the 2013 season.

While both provide their fair share of drama to an otherwise mundane preseason game between two of 2013’s bottom-dwellers, there are an abundance of other intriguing storylines that have greater implications for the Redskins upcoming season.

Here are a few things to watch for: [Read more…]

%d bloggers like this: