July 2, 2015

Key offseason questions for the Washington Capitals

Braden Holtby Washington Capitals Practice, 10/07/2014 (Photo by Cheryl Nichols/District Sports Page)

Braden Holtby Washington Capitals Practice, 10/07/2014 (Photo by Cheryl Nichols/District Sports Page)

With the Washington Capitals out of the playoffs, the focus now must turn from the 2015 postseason to the 2015-16 season. There truly is no rest for the weary as the Caps now must face several key offseason questions.

Despite how the season may have ended, Barry Trotz’s first season behind the bench in Washington was a successful one — he led the Caps back into the postseason and came within one win of knocking off the President’s Trophy winners, but that only matters if the team is able to capitalize on the strides they made.

Here are the biggest questions the team now faces as they head into the offseason:

How much will Braden Holtby cost?

Braden Holtby was absolutely phenomenal for the Caps with a .944 save percentage in the playoffs. In fact, Holtby currently owns the all-time highest career playoff percentage. Holtby also proved his worth in the regular season, playing 73 games and earning 41 wins.

This is pretty good timing for the Saskatchewan native as he is now a restricted free agent. Before you start thinking about a blank check with a lot of zeros, however, the fact that Holtby is a restricted free agent does  give the team the option of a “bridge” contract — a short-term deal to take him out of restricted status.

Essentially a bridge deal allows for the player to make more money without the team having to commit to a long-term deal yet. At this point, however, what is there left for Holtby to prove?

Bridge contracts can sometimes seem business savvy, but to give Holtby a “prove it” type deal after the season he just had seems silly considering that he also had a strong postseason showing in 2012.

Other teams could also force the Caps’ hand. Restricted free agents can receive offer sheets from other teams which does not happen a lot, but for a budding star/elite goalie Holtby is sure to generate some interest from around the league. Chances are this won’t happen and even if it does, it seems unfathomable to think the Caps won’t match regardless of what the offer might be.

So what is Holtby ultimately worth?

Henrik Lundqvist currently has the highest cap hit among NHL goalies at $8.5 million, but that seems a tad unreasonable. Holtby falls much closer to the $6-7 million range, probably closer to the lower end of that spectrum given that Holtby has only been a starter for one full season.

Will Mike Green be back?

Mike Green is coming off a contract that paid him about $6 million per year and was a third-pair defenseman this season. Regardless of what anyone thinks he is worth, one thing is guaranteed: another NHL team will offer Green more money than the Caps will. That is a 100 percent, take it to the bank guarantee. How much more money he’s offered will ultimately determine whether he returns.

While Green is on the third-pair with the Caps, there are other teams who will be willing to give him a bigger role on their team and therefore will offer him significantly more money.

Green has made it clear he wants to stay in Washington and would perhaps be willing to take a paycut, but we are probably talking about several million dollars. That makes Green’s return unlikely.

Who will be the top-line RW?

Besides re-signing Holtby, finding a top line right wing will be a top priority this offseason.  Given that Trotz tried just about everyone he could on that top line, this suggests the next right wing is either not on the roster or is still developing.

If you think Marcus Johansson should be on the top line, that’s great. Trotz tried it and moved on. If you think Joel Ward should be on the top line, that’s great. Trotz tried it and moved on. The same goes for Troy Brouwer, Jason Chimera, Jay Beagle and Eric Fehr. Trotz tried all of these players on the top line and moved on from it.

Coaches on every team shuffle their lines during games and over the course of a season, but not nearly as frequently as we saw from Trotz. Clearly, he was not satisfied with what he saw on the top line.

Depending on how Andre Burakovsky and Tom Wilson develop this offseason, perhaps one of them can step into this role. Both players saw time on the top line over the season with some success. What makes them different from the others on the right wing merry-go-round is how young they are.

We know who Chimera is as a player. We know what you get from a player like Ward and Beagle. Burakovsky and Wilson are still developing and are capable of growing into a top-line role if they progress enough over the summer.

If the team decides neither of them are ready yet, they need to find someone to complete that line.

The free agent class is rather thin, but Justin Williams seems like a potential target. He will turn 34 just as the season starts and could bring veteran leadership and Stanley Cup experience to the roster.

If general manager Brian MacLellan doesn’t like what he sees among the free agents, then he will have to put some kind of trade package together to find one. Trading for a top-line player is expensive, however, and MacLellan will try to avoid this option if he can.

Who will backup Holtby?

The fact that Holtby played in 73 games this season says just as much about how Trotz feels about backup Justin Peters as it does about Holtby.

Peters finished the season with a 3-6-1 record and a .881 save percentage. That’s not good. At times, Peters did not play as bad as his numbers and often did not get a lot of help in front of him but when you play so little it becomes impossible to develop a report with the defense thus compounding the problem.

When Holtby was sick for Game 2 in the playoffs against the New York Islanders, Philipp Grubauer was recalled from the AHL and started over Peters. That should tell you all you need to know.

Considering that Trotz did not anticipate leaning on Holtby this much coming into this season, just think of what will happen next season now that he knows what he has in both Holtby and Peters. Clearly, something needs to change. Having Holtby play so much is not a recipe for success, this team needs a backup they can rely on.

Perhaps the answer is Grubauer.

Grubauer was very good in Hershey this year and has not looked out of place in his appearances at the NHL level. He is still young and no doubt would benefit more from getting consistent playing time rather than serving as a backup, but the team needs to evaluate what his role with the team will ultimately be if Holtby is going to be the long-term starter.

With one year left on Peters’ deal,  it seems doubtful that the team will sign another backup. If Grubauer does backup Holtby next year, Peters could go to Hershey where he posted a .948 save percentage and one shutout in three games this season.

If Trotz has no faith in Peters — which seems to be the case — it makes no sense to go into next season with Peters as the backup.

Who will the Caps re-sign?

Let’s go over the easy ones first. On defense, Green, Tim Gleason and John Erskine will almost certainly be gone. Nate Schmidt is a restricted free agent and the team will want him back.

We’ve already gone over Holtby. On offense, both Evgeny Kuznetsov and Johansson are restricted free agents and there is no reason to think either will not be back, especially Kuznetsov.

Aaron Volpatti will be gone. Curtis Glencross was a deadline acquisition and was a healthy scratch for four games in the playoffs including Game 7 against the New York Rangers. Chances are the team will move on.

That leaves Ward, Beagle and Fehr. With nine points in the playoffs, Ward is someone the team would probably like back, but he was already overpaid on his last contract at $3 million per year. He would have to take a significant pay cut to stay, but at 34, this will likely be the last ‘major’ contract Ward gets. This is a deal MacLellan will get done if he can, but the ceiling for how much Ward can ask will be pretty low before he gets out of MacLellan’s price range.

There is mutual interest in Beagle returning, but the problem with someone like Beagle is that he is ultimately a third- or fourth-line player. If he tests free agency there will be a team willing to overpay for him.  It won’t take much to out-bid the Caps. If he’s not locked up before July 1, he’s as good as gone.

Fehr is a great fit at the third line center and if Burakovsky goes to the right, the team will seek to bring Fehr back. Considering Washington is the only place where things have really clicked for him in the NHL, he will want to stay if at all possible.

What can we expect from the younger players next season?

The long search for a second-line center mercifully appears to be over. Kuznetsov had a breakout postseason scoring five goals and two assists. Caps fans should be drooling over what he can turn into when he reaches his potential.

Wilson was a first-round draft pick which means the Caps saw potential in him as a top-six forward. MacLellan told the media as much on Monday. He is the young player who needs to take the biggest step forward this summer to become a top-six wing. Depending on whether Ward returns, Wilson will likely start on the second or third line with a chance to prove himself. If he finishes the season on the fourth line again, then it may be time to consider whether the damage done to his development from Adam Oates’ tenure may be permanent.

Burakovsky started the season with the Caps, finished it in Hershey but was called back up to the NHL for the playoffs. He managed three points in 11 games, but looked impressive at times. It seems likely that his time in Hershey is over.

Burakovsky’s impact next season will be determined by what position Trotz uses him in. At the start of the season, Burakovsky was playing center, but developing two rookies at center in the same season is a difficult task and he was moved to wing. If he develops enough to challenge for the top-line wing, that’s where he will be. If not, don’t be surprised to see him back in the faceoff circle next fall centering the third line.

Given that Schmidt was recalled in the playoffs when Tim Gleason’s health was in question and  that Schmidt was Hershey’s leading scorer in the playoffs despite being a defenseman and playing in only eight of the team’s 10 playoff games. It would be a surprise if he was not with the Caps next season with Dmitry Orlov as the team’s third-pair.

That would give the team six defensemen leaving Connor Carrick as the odd-man out. He should spend the summer trying to pack on as much muscle as possible onto his small frame.

As for some of the other notable prospects — Riley Barber, Madison Bowey, Jakub Vrana — it would be unreasonable to expect anything from them at the NHL level next season. Neither Barber nor Bowey have spent any time in the AHL and Vrana has played only 13 games with Hershey.

All three are expected to start next season with the Bears. If they end up making any impact with the Caps next season, consider that a bonus.

Washington Nationals skipper still going through growing pains

Washington Nationals manager Matt Williams has had a rough go of it the past couple of days. He’s taking shots for his bullpen management and asking his No. 3 hitter to bunt in extra innings. In his second season now, these are things that he took criticism for in his rookie campaign as well.

Half Street Heart Attack does a good job laying out what happened, so I don’t need to go through it again.

But here’s the thing — Williams isn’t alone in this. It’s fairly typical for managers to develop these roles for the players, especially with regards to the bullpen.

Managers set their bullpens into certain roles for several reasons.

1) Players psychologically appreciate defined roles so they know what’s expected of them and when.

2) Organizationally, it helps when the players, coaches, manager and general manager all have a defined game plan.

3, and most importantly to this discussion) By giving the players set roles, it reduces the liability on the manager. If a player designated with a role fails in that capacity, it’s the player’s fault, or even the GM’s fault — not the manager’s.

The last point is very well illustrated by WIlliams’ own words:

In his first year as a big league manager, Williams has the luxury of calling on Tyler Clippard in the eighth inning.

When Rizzo traded Clippard, a two-time All-Star in the role and one of the most successful relief pitchers of the past four season in all of MLB, they opened a role for “Eighth Inning with a Lead Guy”. It’s a role he thrived in for the Nats, effectively making the game an eight inning contest — a second closer for the eighth inning, if you will.

Logically, it makes the most sense to fill his spot with the best available pitcher, or pitchers. The Nats currently don’t have a player with Clippard’s elite skills to fill that role by himself. Williams, thus far, has tried to pigeonhole Blake Treinen in that role, to varying degrees of success.

Treinen has very good skills, and one day could very well have the success Clippard had in the role, or even be trusted with the ninth inning if it proves that he has the constitution for it. This is the first season he’s been groomed as a one-inning reliever and while many former starters (like Clippard) take well to it, some others (Ross Detwiler) simply do not.

It’s easy for armchair managers to say “play the percentages” and mix-and-match at the back of the bullpen, giving the responsibility to the manager for coming up with the best possible matchup in any late-inning scenario.

So far, Williams has had scattershot success with the bullpen GM Mike Rizzo has supplied him with for the start of the season. Xavier Cedeno is no one’s idea of a lefty specialist (.252/.331/.351 career versus lefties). Matt Thornton has faced three batters all season. Aaron Barrett has barely pitched. Drew Storen went five days without pitching while others blew late or extra-inning leads.

It will be interesting to see going forward if Williams learns from his mistakes and takes on more responsibility to actually manage his bullpen based on game situations, instead of relying on autopilot and the set roles, allowing the players to bear the burden of success or failure in situations they may not be best suited for success.

Washington Nationals make additional cuts; Robinson makes the team

Following the Washington Nationals 4-3 loss to the New York Yankees on Saturday, the team another round of cuts toward the Opening Day 25-man roster.

Lefty reliever Rich Hill was assigned to AAA Syracuse, meaning Xavier Cedeno, who was out of options, will likely be the second lefty in the Nats bullpen.

Non-roster invitee Clint Robinson made the team as a reserve LF/1B. Robinson, 30, was a 25th round draft pick of the Kansas City Royals in 2007. It’s the first time in his career he’s made an opening day roster.

Robinson’s good fortune means Mike Carp did not make the team. He was reassigned to minor league camp. With an out clause in his contract, it was unknown at the time of this post if he would accept the assignment.

 

OPINION: Nationals Have Options as Opening Day Approaches

The Nationals’ roster for Opening Day is starting to come into focus, and there are some surprises as compared with a month ago. With Anthony Rendon, Jayson Werth and Denard Span expected to start their seasons in rehab assignments, the Nats find themselves looking at some additional bench slots, as players on the roster shift around to fill the gaps. Here’s a look at a few of the swaps fans will likely see come April 6th.

Michael Taylor has had quite a spring, including a pair of home runs against Justin Verlander, and is well-positioned to find himself both the CF for Opening Day and the lead off man for Matt Williams. The 24 year old rookie has plus speed and a solid glove, but will likely be back at Syracuse once Span returns barring a miracle. It will be worth it to catch the coming attractions while they’re here, Nats fans, Taylor may well be your Opening Day Center Fielder in 2016, as well.

Danny Espinosa will likely find himself at the hot corner until Anthony Rendon’s knee has fully recovered, which could be until May. Now righty-only, Espinosa has seen some good at-bats this spring against right-handed pitching but his whole season is predicated upon a return to the hitting of his rookie season. Many have praised his approach this spring, but it’s safe to say his career with the Nats hangs in the balance.

Tyler Moore will likely be your starting left fielder on April 6th, and the perennial bench favorite has earned the opportunity his spring with a slash line of .320/.327/.580. While no one will confuse Moore for Jayson Werth and his luxurious beard, that the Nationals can find replacements for three core bats speaks volumes about the depth of the roster right now. For that, Mike Rizzo should be applauded.

What this will do to the bench bats for Matt Williams, though, is a little less clear. I would argue that it is likely to be Kevin Frandsen, a rejuvenated Dan Uggla, the recently acquired Matt den Dekker, and Tony Gwynn Jr., who’s found his swing again. That is definitely not the bench anyone was predicting in February – rather, if you were, please drop me an email with proof and I’ll buy you a beer. It is entirely possible that recently acquired Reed Johnson might displace recently acquired den Dekker in the final roster spot, but I suspect we’ll see a fierce battle with the two of them each getting substantial playing time over the next five days.

This isn’t the Opening Day Roster that Mike Rizzo wanted to run out there; the injuries this spring could conceivably cost this team as many as 4-5 wins this season, though I suspect that’s a worst case estimate. Before you start, fair reader, don’t go blaming these events on a Sports Illustrated curse — curses are silly, and you’re better than that — but do look at the current roster options and rest a bit easier, Nats fans. There’s a lot of depth here, and the prognoses for May returns for Rendon, Werth and Span all bode well for the Nationals.

Washington Redskins training camp notebook

by Justin Byram

The Redskins kicked off training camp on a rainy Thursday morning at Bon Secours Training Camp. Here’s what you missed at the first day of training camp.

Robert Griffin III had a shaky start to camp, his throws were often inaccurate and off target. That could be due to the sloppy conditions he was throwing the ball in, rust, or maybe he just needs more time to get on the same page with his new targets. Regardless, it is not time to panic if you’re the Redskins, but Griffin must improve on his rocky start sooner than later in camp.

Running back will be an interesting position battle to watch throughout camp, Chris Thompson looked very quick, and appeared to be fully healthy. Seastrunk proved to be as advertised showing extreme burst and playmaking ability. Seastrunk also did a nice job catching the ball out of the backfield, I saw him make two difficult grabs (one low and one behind him). Catching the ball out of the backfield is a huge part of Jay Gruden’s offense and the quicker Seastrunk can pick it up the better it will be for him. Both Seastrunk and Thomas worked on returning punts as well.

Keenan Robinson has received a lot of hype this off-season, and rightfully so. The third year linebacker looked extremely athletic and showed great range covering the very talented Jordan Reed (typically a linebacker matchup nightmare) and did a phenomenal job. Robinson looks like he will be a huge asset to the Redskins defense provided he stays healthy.

Another recovering Redskin that looks healthier than I expected him to be was Richard Crawford Jr., who was playing his best football before getting injured last season, and could be an asset in the return game in 2014. Phillip Thomas also looked good, and doesn’t seem to have lost his explosiveness after missing his rookie season with a lisfranc injury.

In addition to returning punts, Andre Roberts made his presence felt immediately, making some nice plays in eleven-on-eleven drills. Roberts might be an underrated addition thanks to DeSean Jackson, but Roberts will be a bigger playmaker than people expect in 2014. Although their timing was off (it will get better with time) DeSean Jackson appears to be the deep threat RGIII has lacked his first two years. Twice today Jackson blew by the defense and Griffin went to him with no hesitation, one ball was a bit overthrown, and the other Jackson probably could have caught but it’s a safe bet you can expect a lot of deep shots from RGIII to Jackson in 2014.

Trent Murphy was put on the field with Orakpo and Kerrigan and formed a very good looking pass rushing trio. Murphy is enormous in person, bigger than I thought he would be and he looked great in his first practice with Washington. Murphy was reportedly one of the first Redskins to show up for camp around 6:30 a.m. (two hours before practice). With Murphy’s hard working attitude and talent, expect him to make an impact early.
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Justin Byram is a contributor to District Sports Page. He covers the Washington Redskins for several on-line publications. You can follow him on Twitter @Justin_Byram.

Predicting the Washington Redskins final 53-man roster

by Justin Byram

With the 2014 Washington Redskins training camp underway, we’ve decided to go out on a limb and predict the final opening day 53-man roster:

To kick off training camp, we are going to predict who makes the final cut for the Redskins’ 53-man roster. Have a question? Leave a comment!

Quarterback: 3

Robert Griffin III

Kirk Cousins

Colt McCoy

With RGIII healthy and Gruden’s tendency to only keep two quarterbacks it is tempting to cut McCoy, however, RGIII needs to prove his long term health before that happens.

Running Back: 4

Alfred Morris

Roy Helu

Lache Seastrunk

Darrel Young

This battle will go through camp and pre-season, but the bottom line is Seastunk is a more durable version of Chris Thompson and was drafted by Gruden giving him the edge.

Wide Receiver: 6

Pierre Garcon

DeSean Jackson

Andre Roberts

Santana Moss

Leonard Hankerson

Ryan Grant

The top three are a lock, but Gruden has stated he likes Moss and what he brings to the table, Leonard Hankerson may start the season on the PUP list but will make the team at one point or another, and Grant has impressed early and was another Gruden draft pick. (if Hankerson opens the season on the PUP look for Alderick Robinson to stick around a little longer)

Offensive Line: 9

Trent Williams

Shawn Lauvao

Kory Lichtensteiger

Chris Chester

Tyler Polumbus

Mike McGlynn

Spencer Long

Morgan Moses

Tom Compton

The starters are pretty set in stone unless one of the two rookies overcomes Chester or Polumbus (I don’t think that happens). The two rookies are locks to make the roster, they are the future of the right side of the line. McGlynn is a solid versatile backup, and Tom Compton is playing right tackle with the second team and looks much more pro-ready than Moses.

Tight End: 3

Jordan Reed

Logan Paulson

Niles Paul

This is a pretty easy group. Jordan Reed is a budding superstar, Paulson is the team’s best blocker and an underrated pass-catcher, and Niles Paul is a special teams ace and when your special teams is as bad as the Redskins’ was in 2013 you don’t cut a guy like that.

Defensive Line: 6

Jason Hatcher

Barry Cofield

Chris Baker

Jarvis Jenkins

Kedric Golston

Stephen Bowen

The starters are set in stone. Jarvis Jenkins is now over a year removed from knee surgery, and looking to make good on the potential he flashed as a rookie, Golston gives the Redskins versatility to play the nose and end position, and Bowen will make the team, but barely as a rotational player.

Inside Linebacker: 5

Perry Riley Jr.

Keenan robinson

Darryl Sharpton

Akeem Jordan

Adam Heyward

Back to the terrible special teams from 2013, the Redskins brought in three athletic inside linebackers who all excel in special teams, which is why Sharpton, Jordan, and Heyward all make the roster behind the starters Riley and Robinson.

Outside Linebacker: 4

Ryan Kerrigan

Brian Orakpo

Trent Murphy

Brandon Jenkins

This is one of the toughest decisions the Redskins will have to make this season. The top three are established, Rak and Kerrigan are two of the best players on the Redskins’ entire roster, and Murphy was the Redskins’ first draft pick and will have a chance to make an impact early. That leaves Rob Jackson and Brandon Jenkins fighting for the final roster spot. Outside Linbackers coach Brian Baker said that Jenkins might be the most improved this season, and the Redskins didn’t make an effort to re-sign Jackson early in free-agency so I’ll give the edge to Jenkins because he is younger with a higher ceiling.

Corner: 5

DeAngelo Hall

David Amerson

Tracy Porter

Bashaud Breeland

Richard Crawford Jr.

Richard Crawford looks healthy despite suffering a nasty knee injury during last pre-season. Crawford was playing his best football before the injury and is a solid special teams player which is why he gets the final spot behind the starters and fourth round pick Bashaud Breeland.

Safety: 5

Ryan Clark

Brandon Meriweather

Phillip Thomas

Bacarri Rambo

Akeem Davis

Ryan Clark and Brandon Meriweather are penciled in as starters, and Phillip Thomas will push Meriweather for playing time early, leaving two spots up for grabs. Bacarri Rambo will get one more chance to prove his potential and that he can improve upon his tackling. Akeem Davis is a great athlete that has turned heads at camp and will be kept around to challenge Rambo for playing time.

Specialist: 3

Kai Forbath

Robert Malone

Nick Sundberg

Zach Hocker will push Kai Forbath for the kicker position, and there is a small chance the Redskins could keep a field goal kicker and a kickoff specialist – but that’s not likely. Sundberg is now the only long snapper on the team so he’s a lock, and Malone has the edge at punter early but that is another competition that will last throughout camp.
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Justin Byram is a contributor to District Sports Page. He covers the Washington Redskins for several on-line publications. You can follow him on Twitter @Justin_Byram.

Washington Capitals add defenseman Matt Niskanen

From the press release:

The Washington Capitals have signed defenseman Matt Niskanen to a seven-year, $40.25 million contract, senior vice president and general manager Brian MacLellan announced today.

“We are very excited that Matt Niskanen has chosen to sign with Washington,” said MacLellan. “At 27 years of age, he is just entering his prime for a defenseman. We feel he will be a staple on our blueline for many years to come. We have stated all along that upgrading the defense was our top priority this offseason and we feel we accomplished our goal with our signings today.”

Niskanen, 27, set career highs in points (46), goals (10), assists (36), games played (81) and game-winning goals (6) in 2013-14, led all NHL defensemen in plus/minus (+33) and was named the team’s Defensive Player of the Year. He also recorded a career-high nine points (two goals, seven assists), led the team with six power play points and was first among team defensemen with 29 hits in 13 playoff games.

Washington Capitals add Orpik, Peters in free agent frenzy

On the first day of the NHL free agent signing period, the Washington Capitals address two major needs, adding veteran defenseman Brooks Orpik and backup goalie Justin Peters. Orpik, 33 and two-time U.S. Olympian, signed a five-year, $27.5 million contract, while Peters inked a two-year, $1.9 million deal. Caps GM Brian MacLellan announced both deals.

From the press releases:

“We are very excited to welcome Brooks to Washington,” said MacLellan. “We feel Brooks’ leadership and experience will greatly enhance our defense for years to come. Brooks plays tough minutes against the opposition’s best players.”

-snip-

Orpik played in 72 games for the Penguins in 2013-14, earning 13 points (two goals, 11 assists) and 46 penalty minutes and ranked first on the team in blocked shots (143) and first among Pittsburgh defensemen in hits (221). Orpik was drafted by the Penguins in the first round, 18th overall, in the 2000 NHL Entry Draft.

and…

We are pleased to sign Justin to a two-year contract,” said MacLellan. “We feel he is just entering his prime and has a tremendous upside. We look forward to him working with our goaltending coach Mitch Korn to reach his potential.”

Peters, 27, appeared in a career-high 21 games during the 2013-14 season, recording a 7-9-4 record with a 2.50 goals-against average and .919 save percentage. The Blyth, Ont., native also represented Canada at the 2014 IIHF World Championship. Peters has posted a 22-31-8 record with three shutouts, a 3.05 goals-against average and a .904 save percentage in 68 career NHL games with the Carolina Hurricanes.

In addition, the Caps re-signed forward Michael Latta, 23, to a two-year, $1.15 million contract.

Washington Mystics trim roster to 12

From the team’s press release:

Washington, D.C. – The Washington Mystics waived the following players: Cierra Bravard, Kirby Burkholder, Haley Peters and Rachel Tecca.  Washington will play their first preseason game of the 2014 season on May 6 in Indiana against the Fever. The roster currently stands at 12.

Nats Nightly Spring Training Edition: Carroll, C. Young cut; Moore & Mattheus to minors

Dave Nichols of District Sports Page and Patrick Reddington of SBNation’s Federal Baseball discussed the Washington Nationals most recent roster moves and how the roster seems to be taking shape for opening day.

Check Out Baseball Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with District Sports Page Nats Nightly on BlogTalkRadio
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