July 30, 2014

Washington Redskins key training camp questions: offense

Robert Griffin III hands off to Alfred Morris in Redskins 40-32 win over New Orleans Saints in Week 1. (Photo by Brian Murphy)

Robert Griffin III hands off to Alfred Morris in Redskins 40-32 win over New Orleans Saints in Week 1. (Photo by Brian Murphy)

Training camp is underway in Richmond and that means the season is just around the corner. The Washington Redskins, however, have a lot of work to do before their opener in Houston.

Each year, every team in the NFL has questions they hope to answer during training camp at each position. That is especially true for a team like the Washington Redskins who enter the season with a new coach. With that in mind, here are the key questions for each position the the team needs to answer during camp: [Read more...]

Washington Redskins Training Camp Notebook for July 25

by Justin Byram

Here is what you missed from the Washington Redskins second day at training camp:

* You may be able to chalk up the Redskins shaky offensive performance on the first day to rust or the weather conditions. The Redskins offense including RGIII looked much sharper on day two of camp. Coach Jay Gruden challenged the team to respond after a bad first day of practice and was pleased with how they handled it.

“Yeah, I mean, we had to. It wasn’t a very good practice offensively, in a lot of respects,” Gruden said. “The weather had something to do with it – dropped balls – and I just thought the tempo wasn’t as clean and sharp as I would like it and had to challenge them. So they responded very well today.”

* The Redskins’ hottest position battle might just be running back. The only player who should feel completely safe is Alfred Morris, and Roy Helu isn’t far behind him. However, Chris Thompson received praise from Gruden today saying the second year back looked good today. Thompson will battle Lache Seastrunk for the change-of-pace back, and both have the ability to make an impact in the passing game out of the backfield as well (that is still to be determined, and will play a large role in who makes the team).

“He’s got the speed,” Gruden said of Thompson. “He’s got the hands. He’s got the quickness. He’s got everything you’re looking for. We’ve just got to make sure he stays healthy. He’s had a little bit of the injury bug the last couple of years, and – knock on wood – he’s been healthy and he’s looked good. So he’s definitely going to compete for that spot.”

Add Silas Redd to the mix as well, he has looked good so far in camp, and although he has an uphill battle to make the roster he shouldn’t be counted out completely. Another scenario that is unlikely but shouldn’t be ruled out completely is if Seastrunk, Thompson, and Redd all impress during pre-season cutting Roy Helu who is set to make more money this year than work-horse starter Alfred Morris.

* Jay Gruden’s brother and father were visitors to camp today. Jon briefly spoke to the media, and stressed the importance of patience with RGIII’s development. He does have a point, Griffin is currently participating in his first full off-season program, while learning a new offense, and adjusting and attempting to build chemistry with his new targets, not the easiest process and there will be bumps in the road but the sky is still the limit for this offense.

* DeSean Jackson responded to the classic “do you think RG3 will be able to keep all his weapons happy with targets?” Jackson pointed out that he would rather be on a team full of weapons, going on to say that with all the weapons they have it will be difficult to focus or double team one player, and if a defense focuses too much on the receivers RG3 and Morris can hurt opponents with their legs.

“Honestly, me and Andre [Roberts] were just talking about it earlier,” Jackson said. “It’s very dangerous and it’s very scary – I’d rather be on the team that has all the weapons. It just makes it easier for Robert. Actually, me and Andre were saying every play somebody has to be open. With me, Tana [Santana Moss], Pierre [Garçon], J-Reed [Jordan Reed], Roberts, it’s so many options – Alfred Morris. “

“There’s just so many options that regardless of how you play it, somebody’s going to have to keep an eye on RGIII, because if not, he’s going to run. If somebody doesn’t get double teamed, another receiver is going to be open. So like I said, we’re putting in the effort to go out there and just all be open. As long as we’re all open, it makes it easier for RGIII, so that’s what we look forward to.”

Gruden spoke about the flexibility his offense has with all the weapons they have.

“You want to get people involved,” Gruden said. ” That’s what the beauty of this offense hopefully is – being able to spread the ball around. We are able to get the running game involved, we are able to get Andre Roberts, DeSean, and Pierre their touches and Robert [Griffin III] whatever he need to do. Darrel Young, Jordan Reed, even [Logan] Paulsen, we’ve got to try to get everybody involved.”

“When we call a play, we don’t know who the ball is going to. We don’t call a play and say, ‘Throw it to this guy no matter what,’ unless it’s a special circumstance. It’s up to the quarterback to make the reads. Some days DeSean will have 10 catches for 200 yards. Maybe he will have two catches for eight yards. We don’t know how it’s going to play out, how the defenses are going to cover us, but the coverage should dictate where the ball goes and hopefully with the weapons that we have, a certain guy can make a defense play depending on how they are playing us.”

* I love what DeAngelo Hall said to the media, Hall knows he is at the end of his career and is enjoying his time in the NFL while he can. Hall is also stepping into a bigger leadership role and looks to take over the vocal leader role that London Fletcher possessed the past few seasons.
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Justin Byram is a contributor to District Sports Page. He covers the Washington Redskins for several on-line publications. You can follow him on Twitter @Justin_Byram.

Washington Redskins training camp notebook

by Justin Byram

The Redskins kicked off training camp on a rainy Thursday morning at Bon Secours Training Camp. Here’s what you missed at the first day of training camp.

Robert Griffin III had a shaky start to camp, his throws were often inaccurate and off target. That could be due to the sloppy conditions he was throwing the ball in, rust, or maybe he just needs more time to get on the same page with his new targets. Regardless, it is not time to panic if you’re the Redskins, but Griffin must improve on his rocky start sooner than later in camp.

Running back will be an interesting position battle to watch throughout camp, Chris Thompson looked very quick, and appeared to be fully healthy. Seastrunk proved to be as advertised showing extreme burst and playmaking ability. Seastrunk also did a nice job catching the ball out of the backfield, I saw him make two difficult grabs (one low and one behind him). Catching the ball out of the backfield is a huge part of Jay Gruden’s offense and the quicker Seastrunk can pick it up the better it will be for him. Both Seastrunk and Thomas worked on returning punts as well.

Keenan Robinson has received a lot of hype this off-season, and rightfully so. The third year linebacker looked extremely athletic and showed great range covering the very talented Jordan Reed (typically a linebacker matchup nightmare) and did a phenomenal job. Robinson looks like he will be a huge asset to the Redskins defense provided he stays healthy.

Another recovering Redskin that looks healthier than I expected him to be was Richard Crawford Jr., who was playing his best football before getting injured last season, and could be an asset in the return game in 2014. Phillip Thomas also looked good, and doesn’t seem to have lost his explosiveness after missing his rookie season with a lisfranc injury.

In addition to returning punts, Andre Roberts made his presence felt immediately, making some nice plays in eleven-on-eleven drills. Roberts might be an underrated addition thanks to DeSean Jackson, but Roberts will be a bigger playmaker than people expect in 2014. Although their timing was off (it will get better with time) DeSean Jackson appears to be the deep threat RGIII has lacked his first two years. Twice today Jackson blew by the defense and Griffin went to him with no hesitation, one ball was a bit overthrown, and the other Jackson probably could have caught but it’s a safe bet you can expect a lot of deep shots from RGIII to Jackson in 2014.

Trent Murphy was put on the field with Orakpo and Kerrigan and formed a very good looking pass rushing trio. Murphy is enormous in person, bigger than I thought he would be and he looked great in his first practice with Washington. Murphy was reportedly one of the first Redskins to show up for camp around 6:30 a.m. (two hours before practice). With Murphy’s hard working attitude and talent, expect him to make an impact early.
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Justin Byram is a contributor to District Sports Page. He covers the Washington Redskins for several on-line publications. You can follow him on Twitter @Justin_Byram.

Predicting the Washington Redskins final 53-man roster

by Justin Byram

With the 2014 Washington Redskins training camp underway, we’ve decided to go out on a limb and predict the final opening day 53-man roster:

To kick off training camp, we are going to predict who makes the final cut for the Redskins’ 53-man roster. Have a question? Leave a comment!

Quarterback: 3

Robert Griffin III

Kirk Cousins

Colt McCoy

With RGIII healthy and Gruden’s tendency to only keep two quarterbacks it is tempting to cut McCoy, however, RGIII needs to prove his long term health before that happens.

Running Back: 4

Alfred Morris

Roy Helu

Lache Seastrunk

Darrel Young

This battle will go through camp and pre-season, but the bottom line is Seastunk is a more durable version of Chris Thompson and was drafted by Gruden giving him the edge.

Wide Receiver: 6

Pierre Garcon

DeSean Jackson

Andre Roberts

Santana Moss

Leonard Hankerson

Ryan Grant

The top three are a lock, but Gruden has stated he likes Moss and what he brings to the table, Leonard Hankerson may start the season on the PUP list but will make the team at one point or another, and Grant has impressed early and was another Gruden draft pick. (if Hankerson opens the season on the PUP look for Alderick Robinson to stick around a little longer)

Offensive Line: 9

Trent Williams

Shawn Lauvao

Kory Lichtensteiger

Chris Chester

Tyler Polumbus

Mike McGlynn

Spencer Long

Morgan Moses

Tom Compton

The starters are pretty set in stone unless one of the two rookies overcomes Chester or Polumbus (I don’t think that happens). The two rookies are locks to make the roster, they are the future of the right side of the line. McGlynn is a solid versatile backup, and Tom Compton is playing right tackle with the second team and looks much more pro-ready than Moses.

Tight End: 3

Jordan Reed

Logan Paulson

Niles Paul

This is a pretty easy group. Jordan Reed is a budding superstar, Paulson is the team’s best blocker and an underrated pass-catcher, and Niles Paul is a special teams ace and when your special teams is as bad as the Redskins’ was in 2013 you don’t cut a guy like that.

Defensive Line: 6

Jason Hatcher

Barry Cofield

Chris Baker

Jarvis Jenkins

Kedric Golston

Stephen Bowen

The starters are set in stone. Jarvis Jenkins is now over a year removed from knee surgery, and looking to make good on the potential he flashed as a rookie, Golston gives the Redskins versatility to play the nose and end position, and Bowen will make the team, but barely as a rotational player.

Inside Linebacker: 5

Perry Riley Jr.

Keenan robinson

Darryl Sharpton

Akeem Jordan

Adam Heyward

Back to the terrible special teams from 2013, the Redskins brought in three athletic inside linebackers who all excel in special teams, which is why Sharpton, Jordan, and Heyward all make the roster behind the starters Riley and Robinson.

Outside Linebacker: 4

Ryan Kerrigan

Brian Orakpo

Trent Murphy

Brandon Jenkins

This is one of the toughest decisions the Redskins will have to make this season. The top three are established, Rak and Kerrigan are two of the best players on the Redskins’ entire roster, and Murphy was the Redskins’ first draft pick and will have a chance to make an impact early. That leaves Rob Jackson and Brandon Jenkins fighting for the final roster spot. Outside Linbackers coach Brian Baker said that Jenkins might be the most improved this season, and the Redskins didn’t make an effort to re-sign Jackson early in free-agency so I’ll give the edge to Jenkins because he is younger with a higher ceiling.

Corner: 5

DeAngelo Hall

David Amerson

Tracy Porter

Bashaud Breeland

Richard Crawford Jr.

Richard Crawford looks healthy despite suffering a nasty knee injury during last pre-season. Crawford was playing his best football before the injury and is a solid special teams player which is why he gets the final spot behind the starters and fourth round pick Bashaud Breeland.

Safety: 5

Ryan Clark

Brandon Meriweather

Phillip Thomas

Bacarri Rambo

Akeem Davis

Ryan Clark and Brandon Meriweather are penciled in as starters, and Phillip Thomas will push Meriweather for playing time early, leaving two spots up for grabs. Bacarri Rambo will get one more chance to prove his potential and that he can improve upon his tackling. Akeem Davis is a great athlete that has turned heads at camp and will be kept around to challenge Rambo for playing time.

Specialist: 3

Kai Forbath

Robert Malone

Nick Sundberg

Zach Hocker will push Kai Forbath for the kicker position, and there is a small chance the Redskins could keep a field goal kicker and a kickoff specialist – but that’s not likely. Sundberg is now the only long snapper on the team so he’s a lock, and Malone has the edge at punter early but that is another competition that will last throughout camp.
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Justin Byram is a contributor to District Sports Page. He covers the Washington Redskins for several on-line publications. You can follow him on Twitter @Justin_Byram.

Jay Gruden to put his stamp on Washington Redskins training camp

“Nothing is worse as a coach than when you let somebody go and they go on and kick your ass later on.” –Washington Redskins head coach Jay Gruden

The Washington Redskins reported to training camp Wednesday, and new head coach Jay Gruden faced the media for the first time at camp. He addressed the lingering injury situations of Jason Hatcher, Leonard Hankerson and Stephen Bowen and of course, talked about his quarterback, Robert Griffin III.

But he spent much of his first media availability talking about himself, his training camp, and how he expects things to go with him at the helm for the first time.

“Every coach wants to have great energy and great tempo, and that’s the big thing,” Gruden said from the training facility in Richmond, VA. “We want to get in and out of the huddle. We want to have great tempo and try to simulate game fashion as best we can. It’s going to be hot. Practices, sometimes they roll into period after period after period.”

“They can be mundane, but it’s important for us as coaches to motivate and keep the tempo moving at a quick pace and make sure we’re learning and coaching and the players are getting needed work – running to the football, pursuit, discipline. All that coachspeak that you hear, it’s what training camp is all about. Fundamentals of football need to be taught every play, every day. The tempo needs to be taught and worked on. The pursuit angles, the pursuit drills need to be practiced and worked on, and we strive for perfection.”

Gruden made sure to point out that he would lean heavily on his assistants.

“I try to use input from everybody. Coach [Jim] Haslett, obviously Coach [Ben] Kotwica, Sean McVay, [Director of Football Operations] Paul Kelly, we’ve all been at different systems and different programs and we’ve seen how different teams do them. Some have been successful, but we try to do what’s best for our team and for this place.”

“We thought practicing in the morning was the best option for us. Just walking out there today, it was hot, so I’m kind of glad we’re going in the morning. I was sweating. This jacket was a bad choice. I used everybody’s input on that as I do in coming up with game plans, and every decision I make will have input. Obviously I’ll have the final say, but I really expect that from the coaches.”

Gruden was asked how his training camp might be different than his predecessors’.

“I don’t know,” Gruden admitted. “I haven’t been to every coach’s training camp, so we’ll see. The big thing is we have a schedule drawn out. Now, how much we stick to that schedule will be determined on how we do. We might have to take a period out or add a period, a live tackling period or something along the way and change it up. I don’t think there’s any special drill in football I’m going to do that nobody’s ever done before. I hope not. It’ll be football.”

Gruden said that choosing the right mix of players for the opening roster is the first priority of the camp.

“I want to make sure we make the right decisions on players, No. 1. We have to make sure we get a good look at all the young guys, all the free agents, all the undrafted free agents, the draft picks, the veteran free agents, and make sure when we make our final cut-down we make the right choices and hopefully these players will make it very difficult on us in making those decisions.”

“When you play four preseason games and you scrimmage against the New England Patriots, hopefully we’ll get enough reps where we do make the right decision because nothing is worse as a coach than when you let somebody go and they go on and kick your ass later on. We want to make sure we get these guys the reps necessary and keep who we think are the best 53 and make the right decisions.”

Addressing the holdovers from last season’s debacle, Gruden said he hopes the players come in with a chip on their shoulders.

“Any time you lose the last one – whether you go 2-14 or we were 11-5 in Cincy and lost the last one – you should have a chip on your shoulder. You should want to get back on the saddle and compete. I think we have the type of guys here that all want to compete, whether they are coming from another team – we don’t have anybody coming from Seattle so everybody in this locker room should have a chip on their shoulder and should be eager to get back on the field and excited to play.”

“Football is a great game, it’s a privilege to play this game and I know they all love it and they want to do well. They are excited. We have worked extremely hard with the strength and conditioning coaches in the offseason program and you see them out there today running. They are all in good shape. Moving forward I feel good about where we are. Now it’s just a matter of getting them out there and playing.”

Washington Redskins report to camp with injury updates

by Justin Byram

The Washington Redskins have now reported for training camp, but not everyone is quite ready to participate yet. Defensive ends Jason Hatcher and Stephen Bowen will both open training camp on the PUP list (Physically Unable to Pperform); joining them on the PUP list will be Wide receiver Leonard Hankerson.

All three players are recovering from knee injuries, however, each is in different stages of their recovery.

Jason Hatcher is probably the closest to returning to action, but the Washington Redskins aren’t taking any chances on their biggest defensive addition, and he will return when he is 100% ready. Head coach Jay Gruden was optimistic Hatcher would play at some point during camp. “He’s being monitored closely by Larry [Hess], our trainer, and as soon as they see fit, he’ll be ready to go. But we want to make sure he’s obviously ready to go.”

Hankerson suffered a nasty ACL injury in 2013, and with the receiver depth the team has there is no reason to rush Hankerson back before he’s fully ready. However, Hankerson was seen doing conditioning workouts, running and cutting, so it seems that Hankerson is recovering well.

Stephen Bowen is the most interesting situation. Bowen underwent microfacture surgery this off-season and is fighting to prove that he can still be effective and worth his high cap number (he is the fifth highest paid player on the roster). The longer Bowen is out of camp, the less likely he is to make the team. Bowen is in the most danger of losing his job/roster spot, so he will be the player to watch closest throughout camp.

The cornerback position will be at full strength to start training camp with Tracy Porter and Richard Crawford Jr. being cleared for all football activities. Porter was expected to be fully recovered from an off-season shoulder surgery, however Crawford is a bigger surprise to be fully ready to go this early in camp.

Crawford suffered a nasty knee injury, tearing just about every ligament in his knee last pre-season. Crawford was playing his best football before going down, and if he can return to form he will be an asset to the Redskins not only in coverage but in the return game.

It is also worth noting that although he didn’t come out and say it, Jay Gruden implied that Bowen and Hankerson are far behind Hatcher. Gruden confirmed that he expected Hatcher to return to action sooner than later, but when asked about Bowen and Hankerson he wouldn’t commit saying: “I never like to try to make predictions on when guys are going to come back”.

Brian Orakpo feels like he has nothing to prove to Washington Redskins

Redskins LB Brian Orakpo can only watch from sidelines in Week 2 loss to Rams. (Photo Courtesy of Brian Murphy)

Redskins LB Brian Orakpo can only watch from sidelines in Week 2 loss to Rams. (Photo Courtesy of Brian Murphy)

The deadline for franchise players to sign long-term deals has come and gone and Brian Orakpo’s future with the Washington Redskins remains uncertain. The franchise tag will keep him in D.C. for this season, but beyond that there is plenty of reason to wonder if Orakpo will remain here in the future.

Orakpo was a first-round draft pick in 2009 when he was selected by the Washington Redskins and is a three-time Pro Bowler. The problem, however, is money. [Read more...]

OPINION: Time for Washington Redskins to change name

I have long resisted entering this debate, but the time has come that I commit my opinion publically, for whatever that is worth. Being one-eighth native American, I have long wrestled with whether my affinity for the NFL team that resides in Washington (technically, Virginia and Maryland, but I digress) should override the just plain wrongness of its nickname. It should not.

The Washington Redskins should change their name.

I have been a fan of the Washington Redskins since I was a child. One of my first real memories was Super Bowl VII, huddled around a small black and white television in our home in Fairfax with my mom. I remember the excitement when Mike Bass returned the blocked field goal for a touchdown, and the disappointment when the team lost to the “perfect” Miami Dolphins.

I was in high school and college during the championship years of Joe Gibbs and the Hogs and the Fun Bunch and Riggo and believed it was my birthright for my team to win the NFC East and have a chance to truly compete for the Super Bowl every year.

As an adult, I had season tickets to the games for a couple of years until the misery associated with 10-hour Sundays at FedEx Field got too much to bear.

I understand the feeling of camaraderie in being associated with a group of fans that take pride in their team. That’s what sports is all about. There’s nothing better than the euphoria when your team wins the big game. All those years going through the “bad times” are rationalized away when the team finally wins.

But that euphoria doesn’t justify institutional racism.

There are no winners in this game. The “defenders” are too busy crying “political correctness” to see the big picture, the team is too busy defending what they think are its rights, and those that are offended — truly offended — continue to suffer in silence as they have since colonial times.

There are three reasons it is beyond time for the team to change its name:

THE TERM “REDSKIN” IS DEMEANING AND PEJORATIVE

There are studies on both side of the origin of the word “redskin.” The origin of the term is immaterial. The term was widely and publically used as a pejorative for many decades and, according to the literal definition in the dictionary, still is.

It does not matter if you are not personally offended by the word, or if I am or not. it doesn’t matter if a large group — even a majority – of people are not offended. It does not matter if you use the term solely to describe the NFL team or not. It only matters that there is a segment of people — by the way, AMERICAN PEOPLE — that are offended and demeaned by the term’s use.

Like any other type of harassment, the intent of someone using the term is irrelevant to whether another finds it offensive.

That’s the very definition of institutional racism. Because so many (non-offended) people use a word that was once demeaning and pejorative in a manner that is not necessarily so, that term has now been, more or less, accepted as a society to have taken that second meaning. That, my friends, is a perfect example of institutional racism.

History shows how native American people have been systematically oppressed damn near to the point of extinction. No amount of public relations fluffery can make a dent in the damage that continues in the name of “team pride.”

Ironically, everyone that opposes the name change is a victim themselves of the institutional racism they oppose and they are completely unaware of it.

And that is very, very wrong.

THE TERM “WASHINGTON REDSKINS” NOW REPRESENTS EMBARRASSMENT

The very first thing that comes up when one identifies themselves as a fan of the team is the name debate. The second is the other person’s opinion of Daniel Snyder. Maybe the third thing is RGIII, and not how exciting a football player he is, but how the whole mess about how his injury was handled.

This is how the Washington Redskins are perceived from outside the beltway. As a joke, at best. A punchline. An embarrassment.

Not with words like “pride” or “history” or “legacy”, as the team’s promotion material so stridently tries to pull the wool over the eyes of the fervent, defending their trademarks and wordmarks until the very end.

In other words, most of the country doesn’t even think about football at all when the term Washington Redskins is brought up. Through the team and ownership’s own actions and words, the very ideals they claim that the name represents are rendered an afterthought.

There’s no talk nationally about how the team will fare on the field. It’s just the incessant talk about the name change and the dysfunction surrounding the team. Eventually, fans of the team will die off (figuratively and literally) and new ones won’t take their place because of the embarrassment associated with the team.

I think even the most fervent “defenders” would agree that the headache associated with being a fan of the Washington Redskins outweighs whatever benefit comes from the arrangement.

THE TEAM WILL CONTINUE TO MAKE MONEY REGARDESS THE OUTCOME

There have been lawsuits over the past 20 years, and so far the Washington Redskins have come out on top. Maybe that actually fuels the hubris by the organization with regards to the name change. But they face another challenge in the courts, as Wednesday’s ruling by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office canceled the Washington Redskins’ trademark registrations for the team’s name Wednesday, claiming it is “disparaging to Native Americans.” 

The case, brought to the PTO’s Trademark Trial and Appeal Board by five Native Americans in 2006, removed six federal trademarks that included the word “Redskin”…

“The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board agreed with our clients that the team’s name and trademarks disparage Native Americans,” Jesse Witten, the plaintiff’s attorney told Politico. “The Board ruled that the Trademark Office should never have registered these trademarks in the first place.”

The team issued a sternly-worded press release, vowing to continue its fight for its name and trademarks.

We’ve seen this story before.   And just like last time, today’s ruling will have no effect at all on the team’s ownership of and right to use the Redskins name and logo. [ed.--team's bold face]

 -snip-

We are confident we will prevail once again, and that the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s divided ruling will be overturned on appeal.  This case is no different than an earlier case, where the Board cancelled the Redskins’ trademark registrations, and where a federal district court disagreed and reversed the Board.

As for public opinion, well, we’ve been down that road already. But the most recent and obvious example of public opinion swaying against the team was the two minute PSA that appeared during the NBA Finals on national television, sponsored by the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation of native Americans. It was moving and poignant, and of course was met with derision and contempt by “defenders”.

But eventually, public opinion will win. Scores of colleges and high schools have changed their names over the past several decades. More will follow. It’s not enough that the once socially acceptable nicknames are “history” and used with “pride” by those associated with those institutions. As we detailed above, it’s institutional racism.

The Washington Redskins, despite years of futility on the field, are still one of the most profitable franchises in the league. They will continue to do so even if forced to change the name and mascot. The NFL has a license to print money. Between the massive broadcast contracts, merchandise sales, stadium and parking concessions, and overwhelming dominance in the sporting landscape, the team will continue to thrive regardless of what it is called.

Despite their adamant defense of its trademarks and wordmarks, the team stands to heavily profit from a name change, when the eventuality finally presents itself. It is only due to the hubris of its ownership that the team still fights so fervently against public opinion and governmental interjection.

***

Going forward, as Editor-in-Chief of District Sports Page I am instructing all of our writers to refer to the team as “Washington Redskins”, in full, in any mention of the team in any game story, article, analysis or opinion. We will no longer use the term “redskins” or “skins” as a stand-alone references to the team in any form.

I realize that our reach and scope is limited. I also realize that it’s a fine editorial line I’m making between the protected wordmark “Washington Redskins” and the pejorative “redskins” or “skins”. Until the team changes its name — or is forced to — we’re left with imperfect options.

Redskins Respond to U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Decision

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has canceled six of the Washington Redskins’ trademark registrations, ruling that the team name is “disparaging of Native Americans.”

Below is the press release issued Wednesday afternoon by the Redskins:

LOUDOUN COUNTY, Va. – The following is a statement by Bob Raskopf, trademark attorney for the Washington Redskins, regarding today’s split decision by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board:

“We’ve seen this story before.   And just like last time, today’s ruling will have no effect at all on the team’s ownership of and right to use the Redskins name and logo.

  • ‘Redskins Are Denied Trademarks’ -Washington Post, April 3, 1999
  • ‘Redskins Can Keep Trademark, Judge Rules’ -Washington Post, October 2, 2003

We are confident we will prevail once again, and that the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s divided ruling will be overturned on appeal.  This case is no different than an earlier case, where the Board cancelled the Redskins’ trademark registrations, and where a federal district court disagreed and reversed the Board.

As today’s dissenting opinion correctly states, “the same evidence previously found insufficient to support cancellation” here “remains insufficient” and does not support cancellation.

This ruling – which of course we will appeal – simply addresses the team’s federal trademark registrations, and the team will continue to own and be able to protect its marks without the registrations.  The registrations will remain effective while the case is on appeal.

When the case first arose more than 20 years ago, a federal judge in the District of Columbia ruled on appeal in favor of the Washington Redskins and their trademark registrations.

Why?

As the district court’s ruling made clear in 2003, the evidence ‘is insufficient to conclude that during the relevant time periods the trademark at issue disparaged Native Americans…’ The court continued, ‘The Court concludes that the [Board’s] finding that the marks at issue ‘may disparage’ Native Americans is unsupported by substantial evidence, is logically flawed, and fails to apply the correct legal standard to its own findings of fact.’ Those aren’t my words. That was the court’s conclusion.  We are confident that when a district court review’s today’s split decision, it will reach a similar conclusion.

In today’s ruling, the Board’s Marc Bergsman agreed, concluding in his dissenting opinion:

It is astounding that the petitioners did not submit any evidence regarding the Native American population during the relevant time frame, nor did they introduce any evidence or argument as to what comprises a substantial composite of that population thereby leaving it to the majority to make petitioner’s case have some semblance of meaning.

The evidence in the current claim is virtually identical to the evidence a federal judge decided was insufficient more than ten years ago. We expect the same ultimate outcome here.”

OPINION: For Washington Redskins, a name change is just a matter of time

In the midst of a busy offseason for the Washington Redskins, there are plenty of story lines we could be discussing. We could be talking about if Robert Griffin III can return to the dynamic playmaker he was in his rookie season, the surprise signing of DeSean Jackson and how he will fit into the offense, how first year head coach Jay Gruden intends to rebuild the Redskins, etc, etc, etc.

Yet, the topic of conversation continues to be the team name. [Read more...]

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